fbpx

Red Dress Day – May 5

Posted on

On May 5th, Red Dress Day raises national awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous women, girls, and Two-Spirit people, honoring the lives of all those who have been impacted by violence.

At College of the Rockies, we pledge to combat violence against Indigenous women, girls, and TwoSpirit people by ensuring Indigenous representation on our Sexualized Violence, Prevention and
Response Committee and by raising awareness through an annual Red Dress Day event at the College.

Red Dress Day sheds light on the ongoing issue of violence against Indigenous women, girls, and TwoSpirit people, rooted in a history of marginalization and dehumanization. Indigenous women, girls, and Two-Spirit people in Canada experience high levels of violence, including assault, homicide, and
trafficking. A 2014 RCMP report found that Indigenous women are four times more likely to be murdered than non-Indigenous women, reflecting systemic issues like colonialism, racism, poverty, and
intergenerational trauma.

The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls completed their Final
Report in 2019. “Reclaiming Power and Place” includes Calls to Justice that urge all people in Canada to
play a role in combating violence against Indigenous women, girls, and Two-Spirit people. Here are some of the ways that you can play a part:

  1. Speak up – inform others about Red Dress Day and attend a Red Dress Day event.
  2. Learn the true history of Canada and Indigenous People – Take an Indigenous Studies Course at
    the College: INDG 101, 105, 203, 240).
  3. Read the Final Report “Reclaiming Power and Place” – Listen to the experiences of Indigenous
    women, girls, and Two-Spirit people.

On Red Dress Day, let’s honor the lives of Indigenous women, girls, and Two-Spirit people across Canada. We must educate ourselves about the violence faced by Indigenous communities and take meaningful steps to stand in solidarity as we work towards a future where all Indigenous peoples live free from fear and injustice.

Sincerely,

Dana Wesley
Executive Director Indigenous Strategy and Reconciliation